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Arts

Arts and culture

In the future, once analog filmmaking is finally dead and buried, will we look back on the rise of Snapchat and Instagram as a pivotal moment in visual storytelling? The rapid-fire, three-second video onslaughts of life you get when you tap through a friend's "story" have pioneered a new kind of visual language, one that strips away storytelling conventions like setup and narration, leaving behind only the purest sensory glaze on the larger framework of a music festival or a protest march.

As she moves through middle age, there's a whiff of acid in every Emma Thompson performance that adds a lively bump to the actress's Stateside image as an eternally flowering English Rose. The bracing asperity that juiced Thompson's self-directed turn as a warty governess in Nanny McPhee, as a bigoted headmistress in An Education, as the neurotic Mary Poppins author P. L. Travers in Saving Mr.

You know a movie is lousy when its most ardent partisans — which in the case of Shane Black's new definite-article-attaching Predator sequel-not-reboot The Predator, are me, myself, and this guy right here with the thumbs — are reduced to tepid, mildly defensive endorsements like "It's one helluva good time at the movies!"

Saturday Night Live head writers and Weekend Update hosts Colin Jost and Michael Che have different attitudes toward co-hosting the Emmy awards Monday night.

Jost admits to being nervous about hosting — especially when he thinks about the show ahead of time: "I'm thinking about it in advance. That's more nerve racking than when you're actually out on stage."

Back in the '70s, when Sean Penn was a teenager and his dad, director Leo Penn, was working in television, Leo got Sean small roles in a few shows, including a pair of episodes of Little House on the Prairie. But since becoming a movie star, Penn hasn't starred in a TV project — until now, when he headlines a new, eight-hour drama series called The First, launching Friday on Hulu.

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