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Hurricane Florence made landfall Friday morning in North Carolina. While people along large swathes of the Eastern Seaboard have been dreading the storm for days, you can say one thing: it arrived right on time.

We are smack-dab in the middle of Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. Nearly all tropical storm activity in the Atlantic basin occurs between those dates.

A Swiss laboratory likely involved in analyzing samples from a March chemical attack in Salisbury, England, has reportedly been targeted by Russian agents.

The jury is in on marine reserves: They work. Research has repeatedly shown that fish numbers quickly climb following well-enforced fishing bans, creating tangible benefits for fishers who work the surrounding waters. In fact, many experts believe fishing will only be sustainable if marine reserves are expanded significantly.

That's why some activists and scientists are now discussing the idea of creating a marine reserve so big it would cover most of the ocean. Specifically, they want fishing banned in international waters.

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We're going to take a look now at what the latest scientific research says about this hurricane, Florence, and how climate change is affecting hurricanes in general. We're joined in our studio by NPR science correspondent Christopher Joyce. Hey there, Chris.

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