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Updated at 12:28 a.m. ET Monday

To celebrate her upcoming 30th birthday, Amy Steenburg and more than a dozen close friends and relatives packed into a stretch limousine for an afternoon of wine- and beer-tasting around upstate New York.

A game of soccer is underway beneath a hazy afternoon sun.

At first glance, it looks like any other you might encounter in Brazil, a nation celebrated for its unwavering addiction to this sport.

A group of teenage boys in brightly colored shirts battles for the ball, urged on by a coach who is barking instructions with the ferocity of a drill sergeant.

Look again, though, and you soon spot a difference: Not one of these young and skillful players is Brazilian. They are all Chinese.

Five days after a prominent Saudi journalist went missing at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, there are still more questions than answers.

Jamal Khashoggi, a veteran journalist who has been critical of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, hasn't been seen since Tuesday, when he went into the consulate to get documents for his upcoming marriage to a Turkish woman, and apparently never came out.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wrapped up his fourth visit to North Korea on Sunday, describing his talks with leader Kim Jong Un as productive.

Pompeo met with Kim for about two hours, according to a pool report from CBS' Kylie Atwood, the only U.S. journalist who accompanied the secretary on his trip. The visit comes after President Trump's historic summit with Kim in June, which resulted in a vague commitment from Pyongyang to denuclearize.

A year ago, Chinese President Xi Jinping stood before the 19th Communist Party Congress and laid out his ambitious plan for China to become a world leader by 2025 in advanced technologies such as robotics, biotechnology and artificial intelligence.

It was seen as a direct challenge to U.S. leadership in advanced technology. James Lewis, a specialist in China and technology at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, says China recognizes that technological superiority helps give the United States an edge in national security and wants in on it.

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