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With less than two weeks left in the U.S. Supreme Court's term, the justices handed down four decisions on Monday. Defying predictions, three were decided by shifting liberal-conservative coalitions.

Here, in a nutshell, are the results, as well as the fascinating shifting votes:

Dual sovereignty upheld, with Ginsburg, Gorsuch dissenting

Two key Asian leaders — both of whom President Trump has been trying to negotiate deals with — will meet Thursday, when Chinese President Xi Jinping will travel to North Korea for the first time as president, Chinese and North Korean state media report.

The two-day visit was prompted by an invitation from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, according to China's Xinhua News Agency.

The meeting comes just days before Trump and Xi are supposed to meet at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

Legislative districts in Virginia that the Supreme Court previously said were racially gerrymandered have to remain in their redrawn form, the court said Monday, giving Democrats in the state a victory.

The majority decision was written by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who noted that because the entirety of state government wasn't suing to keep the fight going — the case was brought by the state's GOP-controlled House — then it is throwing the case out.

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Is the United States moving toward a war with Iran?

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That option remains on the table according to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Here's what he said to CBS News yesterday.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says one of his "highest priorities" is to take on the leading cause of preventable death in the United States: smoking.

McConnell has sponsored a bill, along with Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, that would increase the tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21.

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Democrats Campaign In South Carolina

Jun 16, 2019

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President Trump may not be seeing red, white and blue on a newly revamped Air Force One after all.

A House Democrat added a provision to the annual defense policy bill to put a stop to the president's patriotic design project. It will keep two new versions of the Boeing 747 aircraft within the projected spending target by banning certain paint jobs and other extras.

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Updated on June 17 at 10:15 a.m. ET

Justin Amash stands alone.

The congressman from West Michigan is the only Republican in Congress to have called for impeachment proceedings against President Trump.

On Wednesday, he was the only Republican to vote to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress.

And he's facing taunts and insults from other Republicans.

In the politics of Washington, D.C., standing alone is rarely a good thing, maybe that's why so few politicians do it.

Republican Strategist On Impeachment

Jun 15, 2019

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The politics of impeachment continue to be a low buzz, mostly among a very small cadre of Democratic Congress people. Now and then, that buzz breaks into a loud hum; it did this week when President Trump gave an interview to ABC News' George Stephanopoulos in which he said...

Week In Politics

Jun 15, 2019

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The Strand Bookstore, a New York City icon that is home to 2.5 million books and 92 years of storefront history, was commemorated by the city and chosen as a historic city landmark this week. Nancy Bass Wyden, the store's third-generation owner, isn't taking it as a compliment.

"Some people have congratulated me, and I said, 'No, this is no congratulations. This is a punishment,' " Bass Wyden tells NPR's Scott Simon.

Bass Wyden feels that the designation is counterproductive.

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

A high-ranking Census Bureau official privately discussed the citizenship question issue with GOP redistricting strategist Thomas Hofeller in 2015, according to emails cited in a new court filing in the legal battle over the potential census question.

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President Trump weighed in today on the explosions on two tankers in the Middle East, and he was not sounding like a man looking to ratchet down tensions.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "FOX & FRIENDS")

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jun 14, 2019

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he might accept damaging information from foreigners about political opponents. After Stephanopolous pressed him on whether he would hand this information over to the FBI, the president said, “I think maybe you do both.”

Friday News Roundup - International

Jun 14, 2019

Military forces continued to attack protesters in Sudan this week, as activists called for the end of autocratic rule.

The government in Khartoum has not only violently cracked down on protesters but has also cut off access to the internet.

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