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It's tomato time here in the mid-Atlantic – the critical moment when those of us eager to pull fat, bright fruit off our own backyard vines in a couple months are scurrying to get tender little plants in the ground.

But as anyone who's spent a few summers of kneeling in the dirt can tell you, healthy-looking vines will not necessarily get you a mind-blowingly delicious tomato. And why?

Remembering A Son In 'Immortal Bird'

Jun 1, 2012

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Can Technology Deliver Better Health Care?

Jun 1, 2012

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Lightning Bug Of A Different Color

Jun 1, 2012

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And now for our Video Pick of the Week. Flora's still here and positioned perfectly to take us on a safari.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: We're still on safari.

FLATOW: We're still on safari.

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This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. For the rest of the hour, weird wildlife discoveries. Flora Lichtman is here to tell us more. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira. Pack your bags because we are going on safari.

(SOUNDBITE OF ELEPHANT)

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This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Journalists should shy away from using the word breakthrough; it is a very rare event. But it's hard to ignore that word when you hear about this experimental rehab technique used in rats.

I'd never seen this before, because I thought it was just a figure of speech referring to kings and noblemen. But in real life, there are creatures that have blue blood — literally blue — like this:

It's no longer just foodies at farm markets or Whole Foods buying antibiotic-free, pasture-raised meats.

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Old People Smell Different, Not Worse

May 30, 2012

If you've ever spent time where the elderly congregate, you may have wondered: Do old people smell different?

A kibbutz in the mountains of northern Israel might seem an unlikely source for some of the world's most expensive gourmet food. But a small farming collective has built itself a lucrative business, supplying some of America's top chefs with caviar that customers pay hundreds of dollars to sample.

What snarky headline writer could resist a story about "hot tuna?" Or how about "tuna meltdown?"

Really, it seems just plain daffy to ignore a new study that says some Pacific bluefin tuna picked up traces of radioactive material from the Fukushima nuclear disaster last year and brought it across the Pacific Ocean.

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