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Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his nearly 30 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow Award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited, and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full-time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

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Finally, time for sports.

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Fans of the World Cup champion U.S. women's national soccer team are getting what they want.

More.

The team began a victory tour last weekend. It runs until October.

It's a heady time for women's soccer. But other women's sports want to take advantage of the moment as well. And they're hoping to overcome cultural obstacles that traditionally have made their sports less relevant.

Powerful potential

It's been a month since the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team won a second straight World Cup, and gained rock star popularity in the process.

Since the win, the goal has been to capitalize on that success.

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And now it's time for sports.

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No matter what else is happening in the world, it's time for sports.

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SIMON: A new name on top at Wimbledon and lots of new jerseys on a lot of NBA free agents. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us.

Good morning, Tom.

The celebration of the Women's World Cup soccer championship shifts this week from France to New York City. On Wednesday, the U.S. Women's National Team will be honored with a ticker tape parade and keys to the city, following its 2-0 win over the Netherlands in Sunday's final in France.

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Some of Bud Selig's new book may surprise you.

In For the Good of the Game, the former Major League Baseball commissioner is candid, sometimes foul-mouthed and angry. That's a stark contrast to his public persona when he led the sport for more than two decades, and navigated tumultuous events like the devastating player strike and the spread of performance-enhancing drugs.

Selig retired in 2015, but he's still closely connected to the game he fell in love with as a boy — and that he helped change in profound ways.

Sharp edges

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And now it's time for sports.

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MCCAMMON: The Women's World Cup is going on in France during one of Europe's worst heat waves. Bringing in the heat here is NPR's Tom Goldman. Good morning, Tom.

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I wait all week to say, it's time for sports.

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SIMON: International women's football - the Women's World Cup now happening in France. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Good morning, Tom.

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Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET

There will be the usual excitement for the Belmont Stakes in New York this weekend — the third and final event of horse racing's Triple Crown.

Every now and then, boxing fights its way back into the crowded sports headlines. Saturday was one of those moments.

Little-known Andy Ruiz Jr. gave sports fans a new Rocky moment. The 29-year-old fighter beat the favored and previously undefeated Anthony Joshua at Madison Square Garden in New York, and he became the heavyweight champion of the world.

Or, to be specific, Ruiz became the champion of the confusing, alphabet soup world of boxing. He's now the top heavyweight in the WBA, IBF, WBO and IBO fight-sanctioning bodies.

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And now it's time for sports.

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SIMON: Abhor the dinosaur - a surprise start to the NBA Finals, a sad reminder of dangers along the foul lines, French Open hedging with round 16. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Good morning, Tom.

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And now it's time for sports.

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SIMON: Fear the deer. The NBA finals almost set a new leader for the WNBA and sad news ahead of the Preakness. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Good morning, Tom. How are you?

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