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Will New Policy Reopen Immigration Debate?

Jun 18, 2012

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, we remember Rodney King. He died this weekend in California.

The death Sunday of Rodney King, the victim of a 1991 police beating in Los Angeles who became a "reluctant symbol of race relations," as the Los Angeles Times says, is prompting many looks back at what happened to him and the Los Angeles riots that followed the 1992 acquittal of the officers involved.

Across the U.S., temperatures are creeping higher, kids are out of school and the days are longer. This can only mean that summer is upon us.

For many, summer also means travel season. Whether you're traveling by plane, train or automobile for that vacation, you're likely to feel the pinch of rising travel costs.

For the first time ever, the U.S. synchronized swimming team didn't qualify for the Summer Olympics. But two of its members, who until recently knew each other only as rivals, are going to London to compete in synchronized swimming duets — against duets that have been together for years.

Mary Killman, 21, and Mariya Koroleva, 22, became roommates early last year, training with the national team in Indianapolis. Previously, they had competed against each other in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Rodney King was found dead in the swimming pool at his home in Rialto, Calif., on Sunday, police said. He was 47.

King's beating by police in 1991 was caught on videotape and then sparked riots in Los Angeles when police accused of excessive force were acquitted.

The Michigan state representative who was barred from speaking during debates on the State House after comments that referenced her vagina, said that in protest she will perform "The Vagina Monolgues" on the steps of the Michigan state capitol.

It's official: The conservative New Democracy party that supports keeping Greece in the eurozone is the winner of Sunday's election in that country.

The victory is likely to ease some of the concerns over a potential Greek exit from the eurozone, and the implications of such a move on the fragile global economy.

After the victory, Antonis Samaras, the head of New Democracy, called for pro-euro coalition, one that would likely include the socialist PASOK party, which finished third. The radical left-wing Syriza party, which opposed the bailout, finished second.

Forecast For G-20: No Big Solutions

Jun 17, 2012

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(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALLGAME")

(LAUGHTER)

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Trip To Afghanistan Gives Uncertain Outlook

Jun 17, 2012

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Eyes On Greece In Elections Redo

Jun 17, 2012

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Many in Egypt today stayed home. That enthusiasm and joy to be voting in a free election for the first time had given way to resignation, during the second round of presidential voting, which started yesterday.

That's the picture reports out of Egypt today are painting.

Perhaps that was most evident with Hussein, a Cairo taxi driver that Ahram, the Egyptian newspaper, spoke to at one of the polls.

Oregon and California are locked in a dispute over something that happened 433 years ago, when Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.

It happened on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where? Oregon or California? The National Park Service is now poised to officially recognize one state's claim.

Last year, members of the 182nd National Guard regiment marked Father's Day far away from their loved ones. This year, they're home with their kids after a year in Afghanistan.

Spc. Bryan Tolley, 29, knows the challenges of being both a soldier and a dad. His son, Ryan, is a shy, blond 18-month-old who happily clings to his dad.

"Seeing his face light up when he sees Dada come through his bedroom door instead of Mama — because he's so used to his mother — it's awesome. I love it," says Tolley of Plymouth, Mass.

The next time you need some help deciding what to pick for a midday munch, try Snack Data, a quirky, illustrated catalogue of foods. Part reference guide, part art project, it's the latest idiosyncratic creation of Los Angeles-based web developer Beau Johnson.

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Monday is the 200th anniversary of the start of the War of 1812. Americans may not know much about that war, but they do know a song the war inspired: "The Star-Spangled Banner." The first scratches of those phrases are on display at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore.

The original quill-and-ink manuscript was written by Francis Scott Key. He wrote the lyrics while being held aboard a British ship. Trying to work out a prisoner release, he watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry — the rocket's red glare, bombs bursting in air.

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