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With the White House facing criticism over President Trump's decision to withdraw U.S. forces from Syria, National Security Adviser John Bolton on Sunday said the drawdown will be conditioned on the defeat of the Islamic State and the safety of Kurdish allies.

Updated at 2:47 p.m. EST

President Trump and U.S. Central Command on Sunday confirmed that a United States airstrike in Yemen has killed one of the militants believed to be behind the deadly USS Cole bombing in 2000.

At least 30 workers were killed and several others injured when a gold mine in northeastern Afghanistan collapsed Sunday, local officials said.

Nek Mohammad Nazari, a spokesman for the provincial governor, told Agence France-Presse the victims were illegally searching for gold and had dug deep in a riverbed in the Kohistan district of Badakhshan province when the walls caved in.

Local villagers and the Taliban alike rely heavily on illegal mining for revenue in the region.

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In Yemen, tens of thousands of children have starved to death in a war led by Saudi Arabia that will soon enter its fourth year. Another 14 million — half the country's population — are at risk of starvation.

The al-Hol refugee camp, in northeastern Syria near the border with Iraq, is overwhelmed with new arrivals. For years, the camp, run by Kurdish authorities with help from the United Nations and other international organizations, has housed thousands of Iraqi refugees. More recently, though, the camp has become home to large numbers of Syrians, fleeing towns where the U.S.-led coalition is fighting the last remnants of ISIS. Hundreds of thousands have become internally displaced, with many families forced to move multiple times.

The 612-pound tuna had to be wheeled into its new owner's sushi restaurant on a low platform, its mouth agape.

Sushi chain owner Kiyoshi Kimura purchased the immense Pacific bluefin tuna in an auction on Saturday at a Tokyo fish market. The fish sold for a record 333.6 million yen, more than $3 million, The Associated Press reported.

The Ukrainian Orthodox Church officially gained independence on Saturday, with the signing of a decree that marked its separation from the Russian church that it has been tied to for centuries.

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew I signed the decree of independence, or tomos, in Istanbul, formalizing a split that has angered Moscow amid a broader political conflict between Ukraine and Russia.

"The pious Ukrainian people have awaited this blessed day for seven entire centuries," Bartholomew I said in his address at the Patriarchal Church of St. George.

Paul Whelan, the former U.S. Marine arrested on suspicion of spying by Russia, continues to be held in a Moscow prison.

Meanwhile, Russia announced on Saturday that the U.S. is holding a Russian national, but a top Russian official quickly dismissed any talk of a detainee exchange.

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Protests erupted in southern India this week...

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Chanting in foreign language).

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Three million people granted access to clean water, 4 million children given food. When charities publicize their work, they tend to focus on successes. But today, a story about a charity that's proud to announce that it's failing. NPR's Nurith Aizenman explains.

YouTube

A band from Mongolia that blends the screaming guitars of heavy metal and traditional Mongolian guttural singing has picked up 7 million views for its two videos.

Thousands of protesters took to the streets in Sudan Friday in the latest wave of anti-government demonstrations that have taken place for more than two weeks.

Police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators who gathered after noon prayers in the capital city of Khartoum, The Associated Press reports. Protesters demanded the upheaval of the country's military regime, chanting "freedom, peace, justice" and carrying banners with the Arabic command for "leave."

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Updated at 4:13 p.m. ET

Embassies of several countries are trying to assist ex-U.S. Marine Paul Whelan as he remains in a Moscow prison over allegations of espionage. Whelan was born in Canada and has since gained citizenship in the U.S., Britain and Ireland.

If convicted, he could face up to 20 years in prison. At least three countries have confirmed that they have requested consular access to Whelan: The U.S., Britain and Ireland say they're working to support him in detention and ensure his rights are respected.

At the beginning of 2018, we made predictions about what the year in global health and development might look like in the countries we cover.

The pundits we interviewed forecast that 2018 would bring a decline in the number of health workers around the world, inspire more humanitarians to share their #MeToo stories and see more conflict that would drive the world's humanitarian crises.

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